Massachusetts Volunteer Law Enforcement Officer Association

News

  • 24 Oct 2012 10:33 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The Somerville Police Department will once again join forces with the Somerville Auxiliary Police and School Crossing Guards on Wednesday, October 31st, Halloween Evening to help make a safe and fun filled evening for Somerville Trick-or-Treaters.

    In addition to the regular Somerville Police force, approximately 20 volunteer members of the Auxiliary Police and 30 School Crossing Guards will take up positions throughout the city, to assist the Ghosts & Witches of Somerville across our busy streets

    The City Schools will also be closely monitored to prevent any damage to school property. “Our goal is to provide a safe and happy Halloween for all of our children”, said Chief Thomas Pasquarello.

    http://somerville.patch.com/articles/halloween-safety-tips-from-somerville-police-41d88873

  • 30 Sep 2012 12:05 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

     

    Officer Derick Siegal was born and raised in Newton, Massachusetts. He is the eldest of three children and the son of Mr. Michael and Mrs. Anne Siegal. Mr. Siegal is a mechanic for the Department of Public Works in Weston, and Mrs. Siegal is a School Traffic Supervisor here in Newton. In 2002, Officer Siegal graduated from Newton North High School where he participated in the hockey and lacrosse programs, and he also worked as a teacher and camp counselor at the Newton Community Service Center. Officer Siegal studied Criminal Justice at Suffolk University in Boston, and he has volunteered with the Newton Auxiliary Police over the past six years. After college he was employed as a campus police officer for two years at Regis College in Weston. He also had the opportunity to attend a reserve intermittent police academy in Reading, MA, and he enrolled in other training classes to include First Responder and EMT-Basic, Police Bicycle Patrol, Defensive Tactics, Firearms and OC. In September 2010, Officer Siegal was hired as an emergency telecommunications dispatcher for the Newton Police Department where he dispatched Fire, Police and EMS calls. He stays active in hockey and lacrosse leagues throughout Boston, and now that he is a graduate of the 29th MPOC Police Academy in Quincy, Officer Siegal is excited to begin his career with the Newton Police Department

     

    Derick A. Siegal was sworn in to the department on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012 at Newton City Hall. The ceremony included remarks from Mayor Setti Warren as well as Acting Chief Howard Mintz.

  • 29 Sep 2012 11:56 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Auxiliary Fire and Police

    The issue

    The city’s 14 auxiliary police officers and 18 auxiliary firefighters have been off the job since November of last year, stemming from a lawsuit filed against auxiliary police officer Robert Dolins. At the latest Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday, Sept. 17, Waltham Mayor Jeannette McCarthy, City Solicitor John Cervone and Director of Emergency Management Bernard Mullin appeared to answer questions about the status of the auxiliary units.

    What we know

    In March, councilors learned that auxiliary firefighters have never been officially appointed and sworn in by the city, and have been exposed to potential liability lawsuits that could have left them without legal benefits.

    Both auxiliary units were suspended and the city examined the legality of the volunteers and what sort of liability they would face.

    The fire auxiliaries are close to being reinstated, but will not be allowed to serve outside of the city, which they did regularly in the past. The Waltham auxiliary fire unit was commonly called to neighboring cities and towns because of an air supply truck they operate. The truck has been unused since the auxiliary was suspended.

    Ward 4 Councilor Thomas Curtin, who first addressed the issue of the auxiliary units, said he was happy to hear that fire volunteers would be returning.

    “I’m obviously thrilled that we have these guys going back to work,” said Curtin. “The service they provide to the city is invaluable.”

    McCarthy said 14 people applied for the auxiliary fire positions and may be on the job shortly.

    The police auxiliary issue is more complicated, however.

    Cervone said reinstating an auxiliary police unit would negatively affect the police department’s national accreditation. In order to not jeopardize the accreditation, Cervone said every person on the force, auxiliary and special reserves, would have to go through the same education and training as a permanent civil service police officer.

    Also, the city’s ordinance, as written, does not allow for auxiliary police officers.

    Many councilors mentioned changing the ordinance as a work-around, but Cervone kept repeating that adding a police auxiliary unit would affect the department’s accreditation and would be unlikely.

    Cervone and McCarthy both mentioned creating positions for auxiliary traffic control officers to operate in the city’s Traffic Commission, since auxiliary policemen were mainly used for traffic purposes in the past.

    Curtin said he liked the idea, but wished auxiliaries could perform other tasks, such as patrolling the schools at night, something he said they did in the past.

    “That makes a big difference, especially in the summer hours,” he said. “I would hate for us to lose that.”

    What’s next

    The matter was placed back on file, but councilors may soon have to find a creative way to get auxiliary policemen back to work, and avoid ruining the police department’s accreditation

    Read more: Meeting Minutes: Notes from Waltham City Council - Waltham, Massachusetts - Wicked Local Waltham http://www.wickedlocal.com/waltham/news/x1851400923/Meeting-Minutes-Notes-from-Waltham-City-Council#ixzz27vEAOOVe

  • 29 Sep 2012 11:53 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The Belmont Auxiliary Police will have a collection point set up at the DPW Yard at 37 C St. on Saturday September 29th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Old or unused prescription drugs may be dropped off for free with no questions asked. You won’t even have to get out of your car. Non residents welcome. Please take some time to check your medicine cabinet and visit us on the 29th . (No needles/syringes, IV bags, thermometers, or medical devices). We also have a Rx collection kiosk in the lobby of the police station open 24/7.

    For more information on the Take Back Initiative visit www.dea.gov or contact Lt. Santangelo at rsantang@belmontpd.org.



    Read more: Prescription drug take back taking place tomorrow in Belmont - Belmont, MA - Belmont Citizen-Herald http://www.wickedlocal.com/belmont/news/x1931753619/Prescription-drug-take-back-taking-place-tomorrow-in-Belmont#ixzz27vD4WGQb
  • 16 Sep 2012 9:48 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Middlesex Reserve Deputy Wins Police Motor Competition

    Middlesex Sheriff Reserve Deputy (and MA-VLEOA Member) Mike Frazier won the 3rd Annual Seacoast Harley-Davidson Police Motor Officer Competition on June 2, 2012. Mike beat out other Massachusetts Motor Officer's for his first place prize.

    Congratulations Reserve Deputy Frazier!

    Left to Right - Officer Neil Nolan Harwich PD with the 2nd Place Trophy and Reserve Deputy Mike Frazier with his 1st Place Trophy

    The Winning Ride

  • 31 Aug 2012 7:32 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    WAYLAND - On a muggy day early in August, seniors in Wayland joined the Wayland Auxiliary Police Department for a cookout. There were almost 40 seniors present who enjoyed being served food by the auxiliary police officers, with help from wives, sons, daughters and nephews. To top off the day, many donors contributed gift certificates to be raffled off to the “seasoned citizens.”

    The Wayland Auxiliary Police Department wants to thank Liberty Pizza, Lavin’s Liquors, Villa Restaurant, Wayland Pizza, Coach Grill and David’s Salon of Sudbury for their generous gift certificate donations. The Auxiliary Police Department would also like to thank the Wayland Police Association for supplying the food and grill, the Council on Aging, and Town Building custodial staff for their help, setup and support to make this a memorable event.

    The Auxiliary Police Department is a dedicated volunteer law enforcement body that serves all the townspeople of Wayland.



    Read more: Wayland Auxiliary Police Department hosts cookout for seniors - Wayland, MA - Wicked Local Wayland http://www.wickedlocal.com/wayland/news/x1733882961/Wayland-Auxiliary-Police-Department-hosts-cookout-for-seniors#ixzz257f1yLMl

  • 20 Jun 2012 4:10 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Melissa Irion

    Belmont Citizen-Herald

    Posted May 06, 2012 @ 10:07 PM

    Belmont - Many Belmont residents benefited from the annual Family Safety Day sponsored by the Belmont Auxiliary Police on April 28 at Belmont High School.

    Outdoor events included car seat safety inspections with Belmont Police Officers Melissa O’Connor and William Regan and a prescription drug take back initiative with Auxiliary Officers Robert McQuaid and Dan MacAuley participated in a prescription drug take back initiative.

    O’connor and Regan are certified Car Seat Technicians, who have completed an extensive 40-hour certification course to install child car seats. Regan said that in the past year and a half they have inspected hundreds of child car seats for the community.

    He said that approximately 90 percent of car seats are installed incorrectly. Parents may contact the officers via email to set up an inspection appointment. “It’s a great program. We don’t refuse anybody. People come in from other towns. Everyone that comes leaves happy. It’s all about the safety of the children,” said Regan

    In recognition of their good work, the Belmont Police Department recently won a $1,500 federal grant to provide cars seats to those who cannot afford them.

    Inside Belmont High’s cafeteria, the Auxiliary Police and Citizens Emergency Response Team (CERT) organized several public safety and health tables. Upon entering, parents were given child safety kits, where they could place dental impressions with DNA, electronic fingerprint scans, and height photographs that were taken during the event.

    To complete the kit at home, parents would complete the child ID information form, include a hair sample, and wrap a Q-tip swab in plastic or aluminum foil. If a child was lost, parents would readily be able to provide police with valuable information to aid in a search for the child.

    A family of public safety officials from the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Public Safety Division, Deputy Sheriff David Morris, Deputy Sheriff Carmen Miranda, and Junior Deputy Sheriff Mia Miranda, assisted parents in obtaining electronic fingerprint samples. Deputy Sheriff Morris reassured parents that the electronic record is deleted from the computer once the printout is given to parents.

    Auxiliary Officer Greg Bogosian and CERT member Suzanne d’Amonville fitted children into complimentary new bike helmets and showed parents how to properly adjust the straps. Officer James Schwab of the Belmont Police Department’s Computer Crime Division provided parents with tips on computer network security and keeping kids safe on the internet. Schwab suggested that parents put their Ipads in a setting called “airplane mode” while children are playing game apps, such as Angry Birds. Airplane mode turns off the wireless content and prevents children from being routed into Youtube videos from the game, without affecting how the game operates.

    Many Belmont residents benefited from the annual Family Safety Day sponsored by the Belmont Auxiliary Police on April 28 at Belmont High School.

    Outdoor events included car seat safety inspections with Belmont Police Officers Melissa O’Connor and William Regan and a prescription drug take back initiative with Auxiliary Officers Robert McQuaid and Dan MacAuley participated in a prescription drug take back initiative.

    O’connor and Regan are certified Car Seat Technicians, who have completed an extensive 40-hour certification course to install child car seats. Regan said that in the past year and a half they have inspected hundreds of child car seats for the community.

    He said that approximately 90 percent of car seats are installed incorrectly. Parents may contact the officers via email to set up an inspection appointment. “It’s a great program. We don’t refuse anybody. People come in from other towns. Everyone that comes leaves happy. It’s all about the safety of the children,” said Regan

    In recognition of their good work, the Belmont Police Department recently won a $1,500 federal grant to provide cars seats to those who cannot afford them.

    Inside Belmont High’s cafeteria, the Auxiliary Police and Citizens Emergency Response Team (CERT) organized several public safety and health tables. Upon entering, parents were given child safety kits, where they could place dental impressions with DNA, electronic fingerprint scans, and height photographs that were taken during the event.

    To complete the kit at home, parents would complete the child ID information form, include a hair sample, and wrap a Q-tip swab in plastic or aluminum foil. If a child was lost, parents would readily be able to provide police with valuable information to aid in a search for the child.

    A family of public safety officials from the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Public Safety Division, Deputy Sheriff David Morris, Deputy Sheriff Carmen Miranda, and Junior Deputy Sheriff Mia Miranda, assisted parents in obtaining electronic fingerprint samples. Deputy Sheriff Morris reassured parents that the electronic record is deleted from the computer once the printout is given to parents.

    Auxiliary Officer Greg Bogosian and CERT member Suzanne d’Amonville fitted children into complimentary new bike helmets and showed parents how to properly adjust the straps. Officer James Schwab of the Belmont Police Department’s Computer Crime Division provided parents with tips on computer network security and keeping kids safe on the internet. Schwab suggested that parents put their Ipads in a setting called “airplane mode” while children are playing game apps, such as Angry Birds. Airplane mode turns off the wireless content and prevents children from being routed into Youtube videos from the game, without affecting how the game operates.

    Auxiliary Officers and CERT members also staffed tables with information about railroad safety from Operation Lifesaver (oli.org) and the Belmont Health Department. A stuffed coyote was on exhibit at a table where participants could obtain tips on coexisting with wildlife. Belmont business owner Frank Manzelli of Tokyo Joe’s Studios of Self-Defense had a table at the event as well.

    Belmont’s Auxiliary Police unit is comprised of approximately 21 volunteer officers whose mission is to serve the Belmont Police Department and the Town of Belmont. The Auxiliary Officers provide evening and weekend patrols, back up the police department as necessary, respond to emergencies, and cover special events.

    Auxiliary Officers and CERT members also staffed tables with information about railroad safety from Operation Lifesaver (oli.org) and the Belmont Health Department. A stuffed coyote was on exhibit at a table where participants could obtain tips on coexisting with wildlife. Belmont business owner Frank Manzelli of Tokyo Joe’s Studios of Self-Defense had a table at the event as well.

    Belmont’s Auxiliary Police unit is comprised of approximately 21 volunteer officers whose mission is to serve the Belmont Police Department and the Town of Belmont. The Auxiliary Officers provide evening and weekend patrols, back up the police department as necessary, respond to emergencies, and cover special events.


    Read more: Belmont Auxiliary Police help make Belmont families safer - Belmont, MA - Belmont Citizen-Herald http://www.wickedlocal.com/belmont/news/x1942572923/Belmont-Auxiliary-Police-help-make-Belmont-families-safer#ixzz1yMjHWQaC

  • 19 Jun 2012 5:25 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Auxiliary Chief Francis Robles Sr. said the class, which graduated Monday night, will be the best yet.

    “We are always looking for new blood, and each class seems to get better and better,” said Robles.

    Lt. Troy Santarlasci, the senior instructor, said the addition of 10 officers will help immensely.

    “It will relieve us of some of the stress we have had trying to fill some of the posts, so it’s a good thing,” said Santarlasci.

    Randolph’s auxiliary department is one of 16 in Massachusetts, but Santarlasci says his force is different than others.

    “We are one of the few who are still sworn, still armed, still have patrol capabilities, so I am very proud of that,” he said.

    The auxiliary department’s main job is to handle traffic at certain town events, such as church services, parades, walks for hunger and county fairs. They also patrol town property Friday and Saturday evenings.

    The department was recently transferred from the control of the town to the police department.

    Santarlasci said that decision will help the department get better training, provide more service and have a more direct line of communication with the full-time department.

    Auxiliary officers are volunteers, and Santarlasci said it costs an officer, who is responsible for providing his own equipment, $3,500 to join the department.

    Thomas Kennedy Jr., one of the newest members of the auxiliary department, said he is excited to make an impact on Randolph.

    “It is an honor to do it and work for the community,” he said.

    Read more: http://www.patriotledger.com/topstories/x681119173/Randolph-Auxiliary-Police-Department-adds-10-officers#ixzz1yHDrFWK5

  • 08 Jun 2012 9:50 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Francis Torres ’12 - Bachelor’s degree in criminal justice

    TorresFrancis Torres walked into the Framingham police station at age 17 looking for a job. Lieutenant Paul Shastany saw an eager future disciple and put him right to work. Nearly five years later, Torres is an auxiliary police officer and ready to embark on a journey to become a full-time police office.

    The Framingham Auxiliary Police was established in 1942 as a civil defense corps to assist in the event our country was attacked. Torres joined the ranks in May 2011. By the time he was 20, he had completed Reserve Academy training provided by the Massachusetts Municipal Police Training Committee.

    As an auxiliary police officer, Torres maintains order in times of chaos. When a state of emergency is declared, he has full police powers. After Hurricane Irene, Torres was in the thick of the crisis, directing traffic when Rte. 9 was shut down westbound because it was littered with debris, broken limbs, uprooted street signs, and fallen power lines with live wires.

    If Torres witnesses a felony, he is expected to act. As an auxiliary police officer, he has full arresting powers if a felony occurs in his presence.

    Auxiliary officers are continually training in all aspects of law enforcement to maintain a high level of readiness in the event they are called upon to assist the Framingham Police Department. This can also include charitable events, directing civilians, and controlling such large-scale events such as the Boston Marathon.

    Torres is grateful for his training inside the classroom as a criminal justice major at Becker College, which prepared him for work as an auxiliary police officer.  The College helped him through the Reserve Academy, where academics play an integral role through courses in constitutional and procedural law. He found a correlation between his Becker courses and the Academy work.  Becker gave Torres the academic foundation he needs for handling real-word police experiences. He was also able to earn college credit for his time with the auxiliary police. 

    Regardless of the hat he is wearing, be it as a student or an officer, Torres sets a positive example.

    He has been a resident assistant, a criminal justice tutor in Becker’s Collaborative Learning Center, and a leader in Becker’s supplemental instruction (SI) program. SI deploys experienced peer tutors to assist students in the classroom.

    After graduating from Becker this spring, Torres will either pursue full-time employment at a police department by taking the civil service examination, or he will pursue a master’s degree in public administration to help him eventually move through the ranks to one day become a lieutenant, captain, or chief.

    Torres is certain that his Becker College education and experience as an auxiliary police officer have prepared him for a successful future career in law enforcement.

    Torrestorres

    http://www.becker.edu/student-life/commencement/commencement-stories/francis-torres-12

  • 04 Jun 2012 4:38 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) will be accepting applications from Massachusetts Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) and Volunteers in Police Service (VIPS) for FFY 2010 EMPG Funding.

     

    MEMA has posted its FFY 2010 EMPG MRC and VIPS Application for Grant Funding (AGF) on its website here: http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/mema/empg-and-ccp-and-hmep-grants.html

     

    MEMA has also posted Guidance on Developing MRC and VIPS FFY 2010 EMPG Applications on its website here: http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/mema/empg-and-ccp-and-hmep-grants.html

     

    MEMA plans to, via this competitive grant process, make available approximately $250,000.

     

    The AGF provides a brief overview of the FFY 2010 EMPG and specific guidance for entities applying for funds. MEMA will conduct general information sessions regarding this AGF; details about these sessions in found within the AGF.

     

    The application deadline is 8/31/12; details on how to submit an application are found within the AGF.

     

    Please contact your respective MEMA Regional Office or Jeff Trask (508.820.2053; Jeffrey.Trask@state.ma.us) with any questions regarding this AGF.

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